Insights from BCC Research

How To Cite Market Research in School Assignments

BCC’s market research is a solid reference that provides weight to whatever project or paper you’re working on. That said, there’s an aspect of it that is often overlooked; citing market research reports correctly.

To start, think of our market research as a pizza. Confused? Check out our breakdown here. Syndicated research, which includes market research reports, is the sauce of the market research pizza.

citation-pizza2

Now, like a pizza, the secret lies in the perfect sauce. There are a variety of ways to make the sauce, but once you choose a variety, you must follow the recipe exactly or else the taste will be affected.

If we put the analogies aside for a second, citing market research correctly really comes down to what your professors require. Are they asking you to cite your references in MLA, APA or Chicago style?

Chances are, you’re not completely certain about how you should be formatting the research, but you do know what style your professor requires.

That’s why we’re going to give you the recipe (yup, we’re back with the analogy) to guide you in cooking the exact sauce, er, citation that your professor requires.

Below you’ll find the breakdown for each citation style, as well as an example of how it should look like when you’re using our reports in your projects and papers.

Now, without further ado, to the citations! These are specific to the reports in the BCC Research library.

Citation for MLA:
Author’s Last Name, / Author’s First Name / “Title of article in quotation marks” / Title of web page in italics / Vol. number / issue number / Date published / page number or range / Title of Website in italics / doi: or URL

Citing our research in MLA:
Kumar, Aneesh. “Probiotics in Food, Beverages, Dietary Supplements and Animal Feed.” Probiotics Market Report on Dietary Supplements & Animal Feed, BCC Research, Jan. 2020, www.bccresearch.com/market-research/food-and-beverage/probiotics-market-ingredients-supplements-foods-report.html.

Citation for Chicago:
Author’s Last Name, / Author’s First Name / “Title of Article in quotation marks” / Title of publication in italics / Date published, / URL

Citing our research in Chicago:
Kumar, Aneesh. “Probiotics in Food, Beverages, Dietary Supplements and Animal Feed.” Probiotics Market Report on Dietary Supplements & Animal Feed. BCC Research, January 2020. https://www.bccresearch.com/market-research/food-and-beverage/probiotics-market-ingredients-supplements-foods-report.html.

Citation for APA:
Author’s Last Name / Initials of First and Middle Name / (Date Published) / Title of Source / Location of publisher / URL

Citing our research in APA:
Kumar, A. (2020, January). Probiotics in Food, Beverages, Dietary Supplements and Animal Feed. Retrieved from https://www.bccresearch.com/market-research/food-and-beverage/probiotics-market-ingredients-supplements-foods-report.html

Don’t be daunted by the initial complexity that comes with citing sources. Going back to our analogy of the pizza sauce, it’s always harder the first time you do it.

But after some practice and repetition, you won’t even have to think about it. And soon, you’ll know exactly what information to cite and how to properly list our research according to your professor’s requirements.

Looking for market research for your paper or project? Type in your topic and find related reports.

Written by Clara Mouawad on Apr 22, 2020 10:00:00 AM

Clara Mouawad is the content writer at BCC Research. She contributes to our blog, social media, email marketing and more.

Topics: Academic Institutions